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LD Conference Mentoring

The Power of a Mentor

ResearchILD’s 35th Annual Learning Differences Conference brought together educators from across the globe to hear from speakers at the forefront of executive function research and implementation in schools. One idea that rang true across many presentations was the impact that an encouraging mentor or supporter can have on a student’s sense of self-efficacy and success.

Nurturing Resilience

Dr. Robert Brooks, who kicked off the conference, shared ideas about how to nurture resilience in students during challenging times. In order to help students cope effectively in the face of adversity, Dr. Brooks emphasizes that children need a “charismatic adult” from whom they can garner strength. Teachers, who often provide this role, must ensure that their students feel welcomed and supported at school before launching into the instruction of academics and executive function strategies.

This sense of security and community is a key ingredient in creating a classroom context that empowers students. Morning meetings and homeroom times can include opportunities for building student mentorships so students feel heard. Dr. Brooks reminds us that it is crucial to build relationships with students and help them feel a sense of purpose, especially in the era of virtual learning.

The Power of One

Dr. Anthony Bashir, a professor at Emerson College and co-founder of Architects For Learning, led one of the conference’s panels alongside two SMARTS alumni, Chace Nolen and William Warren. Dr. Bashir introduced the idea that a single mentor can help guide students through “liminal space,” a place of uncertainty and unknowing.

Supporting this concept, William described a teacher who never gave up on him, trying multiple strategies until he received the help he needed. Chace, recounting the ways he saw aspects of his younger self in his fifth-grade mentee, noted how the SMARTS program gave him a framework for understanding how his brain worked and how it could grow and change.

The importance of relationships for executive function learning and academic success is clear. Whether it is a “charismatic adult,” a peer in middle or high school, or a friend in elementary school, having someone who believes in us can truly change the story we tell ourselves about our self-worth and strengths.

  • Caitlin Vanderberg, SMARTS Intern
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LD Conference

Why Do Teachers Love ResearchILD’s Learning Differences Conference?

Looking for a conference where you can learn more about executive function, ADHD, social emotional outcomes, and how to support the success of all students? We are excited to announce that registration is open for the 35th Annual Learning Differences Conference — now presented virtually!

This year’s Virtual Conference will take place over Zoom on October 9, 2020 – October 10, 2020. The conference will emphasize current work on the importance of executive function strategies in mediating stress and fostering persistence and resilience in students as they navigate the many school challenges.

  • Explore innovative research and the implications for effective clinical practice and classroom teaching.
  • Learn about executive function strategies that benefit all students from kindergarten into high school and the college years and span reading, writing, math, and content area subjects.
  • Receive a Certificate of Participation for 12 hours of instruction.

Is this conference for you? Why should you attend? What do other teachers get out of the conference? Samara Gupta, an attendee from last year, shares what she loved about the conference in the video below:

Find out more and register today!

Hope to see you there!

  • Elizabeth Ross, M.A., SMARTS Media Manager
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LD Conference

Why Do You Attend ResearchILD’s Learning Differences Conference?

“Presenters have deep knowledge of their subjects … and give you strategies that you can use immediately.” — Stephan Stuntz, Assistant Director of Instructional Support, Woodstock Vermont Area Schools Teachers, researchers, and administrators return year after year to ResearchILD’s Learning Differences Conference. Why? Stephan Stuntz, an attendee from last year, shares why he loves the conference:

We have an exciting lineup of speakers and content to share at our Learning Differences Conference .

You’ll learn about:

  • The importance of executive function strategies in mediating stress and fostering persistence and resilience
  • Innovative research and the implications for effective clinical practice and classroom teaching
  • Executive function strategies that benefit all students from kindergarten through college and span reading, writing, math, and other content areas